How Dogs Express Themselves

Ask any devoted dog owner and she’ll tell you that dogs definitely express emotions. The potential problem is when we use human emotions and experiences to decode what a dog is trying to say. Here are five behaviors and the meanings behind them:

  1. BowPlay Bow. Most people recognize this; the dog with his front legs on the ground and his butt up in the air. This is a relaxed dog telling another dog (or his human) that everything is okay and he wants to play.
  2. Sniffing. All dogs sniff, of course, because that is a major way they decode the world. But when you’re taking your dog for a walk and you encounter another dog, sniffing is a way to tell the other dog that everything is okay and they just want to pass.
  3. Sitting. Sometimes dogs seem to sit at the most inopportune times. Sitting is not always just a way for them to rest, it also is a mechanism for the dog to cope with an overwhelming situation.
  4. Go Between. Sometimes two dogs start to play a little too aggressively and another dog that is present may walk in between the two dogs to diffuse the situation. Acting as the go-between helps the two playing dogs to take a step back and resume playing in a more gentle way.
  5. Arc. Canine etiquette dictates that meetings take place from the side rather than head on. This allows the dogs an opportunity to sniff each other first. You should always keep this in mind if you encounter another dog on your walk or in social situations. Give them space and allow them to meet on their own terms.

Keep these behaviors in mind when trying to decipher what your pet is trying to say and how they are feeling.

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Dog of the Week: Ted

Ted

Hi! My name is Ted and I’m a 4-5 year old Jack Russell Terrier. I’m a jack of all trades! When I’m inside, my favorite place will be cuddled up next to you or playing with my toys on the floor. I think squeaky toys and rope toys are amazing! When I’m outside, I’m a brave explorer and would love to have a yard to run around in.

I grew up in a home with 41 other dogs and didn’t get a lot of individual attention, but I am loving life now! I’m learning to sit and down, have good indoor manners, and love attention and treats so I should learn fast if you’re patient with me. I’m a great walker and happily go in my kennel when my foster family is away and sleep in my kennel at night. I would do better in a home without cats (they’re fun to chase!) but I get along great with my doggy foster sisters. I’d love to meet my forever family and come cuddle with you!

Ted 3For more information about Ted, please contact fay.nihart@cardinalhealth.com. The adoption application can be found HERE.

 

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Why Adopt a Mature Dog?

Many times people are under the mistaken notion that older dogs that end up in shelters and rescues are there because they are bad dogs. This simply isn’t true; most of these dogs are there through no fault of their own. Here are some reasons to adopt more mature dogs:

Old Dog1. What you see is what you get. An adult dog’s size and temperament are established and there are few surprises that you might get when you adopt a puppy. Especially if you adopt a mature dog from a rescue where they stay in foster homes, because the foster family can give you the scoop on what the dog is like.

2. There’s no puppy drama. Puppies are a serious time commitment and often mean interrupted sleep, accidents in the house, chewing mishaps, and more extensive training. Adult dogs still need plenty of attention, but they’ve received some training and are probably beyond the chewing stage.

3. The satisfaction of knowing you saved a life. It’s generally more difficult to find homes for more mature dogs so by opening your heart and home to an adult dog, you’re saving a life.

If you’re thinking of adopting a dog or cat, don’t automatically pass by mature pets. They still have a lot of love to give and are so thankful for having a forever home.

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Cat of the Week: Stitch

This week we’re giving the dogs some time off and featuring a cat of the week. I’m pleased to introduce you to Stitch…

Stitch

Stitch definitely has a crazy play mode! When he’s ready to go, he can be a little tornado. The rest of the time I barely know he’s here. Stitch 3If you’re looking for a playful companion, you have found him! Pull out the toys and he will entertain himself, and you, for an hour or two before settling down for a little loving and a cat nap.

He loves all the other animals in his foster home, from the cats and dogs to the rabbit. Stitch has a unique feature that catches your eye when you meet him. He is polydactyl, meaning he has an extra toe on each foot. It makes his paws look big! The vet says he’s going to be a big boy when he grows up; perhaps around 15 pounds!

If you are interested in meeting this sweet, fun little boy, email Crystal at cdmcguire88@gmail.com. You can fill out an application HERE.

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