Why Adopt a Mature Dog?

Many times people are under the mistaken notion that older dogs that end up in shelters and rescues are there because they are bad dogs. This simply isn’t true; most of these dogs are there through no fault of their own. Here are some reasons to adopt more mature dogs:

Old Dog1. What you see is what you get. An adult dog’s size and temperament are established and there are few surprises that you might get when you adopt a puppy. Especially if you adopt a mature dog from a rescue where they stay in foster homes, because the foster family can give you the scoop on what the dog is like.

2. There’s no puppy drama. Puppies are a serious time commitment and often mean interrupted sleep, accidents in the house, chewing mishaps, and more extensive training. Adult dogs still need plenty of attention, but they’ve received some training and are probably beyond the chewing stage.

3. The satisfaction of knowing you saved a life. It’s generally more difficult to find homes for more mature dogs so by opening your heart and home to an adult dog, you’re saving a life.

If you’re thinking of adopting a dog or cat, don’t automatically pass by mature pets. They still have a lot of love to give and are so thankful for having a forever home.

julia sig

 

Tour for Life

We had a great turn out this weekend at the North Shore Animal League America’s Tour for Life Mega Pet Adoption Event! I pulled up just after noon and was shocked by how many people were there already. We had foster homes there with 19 different dogs through out the day and received 17 applications while we were there. (And that’s only because we ran out of paper copies of the applications. 🙂 )

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We would like to say THANK YOU to Iowa Humane Alliance and NewBo for hosting this year and inviting us out!! We’re looking forward to another great event next year! And thank you to everyone who came out to support such a great event!

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IMG_4254We also had a special visitor this weekend. 🙂 My daughter Katelyn made her first appearance at a Last Hope Event. She was even sporting her Last Hope gear!

And don’t forget to come out this Saturday for the Pawsome Paws Walk and Last Hope’s 10 year anniversary! You can register here. Hope to see you there!

crystal sig

From A Foster Lead

Last week we posted about what it takes to be a foster. If you missed it check it out here. Today, I’m going to tell you about the support you get and the team you have standing behind you.

Right now we have 7 awesome foster leads (of which I am one). Each foster home is assigned a lead. Your foster lead is your first point of contact for any questions you have. We are here to make your fostering experience a good one. If you can’t get a hold of your lead, any of the others are willing and able to step in and help.

My first contact with a new foster comes when we receive an application. We have divided up Cedar Rapids, Iowa City, and surrounding areas into territories and each foster lead has their own territory. When one comes in that lands in my territory I reach out via email or phone to set up a home visit. During the home visit I’m looking for 2 things. One, that any animals currently in your home are well taken care of and happy. Two, things in the home are safe and secure for any animals we may place with you. I have done nearly 20 home visits (for foster homes) since I started doing this in March and I have yet to find a home that didn’t live up to those standards. The people who step up to help are usually pretty awesome!

The home visit is your chance to bombard me with questions. Anything and everything you want to know about fostering is fair game. I will also take the time to get to know you and your family. I want to know what kind of dog will fit into your lifestyle. They come in all shapes and sizes, each with their own personality. I want to make sure that both you and the dog I place with you are happy. (If that leads to a foster failure – you end up adpoting the dog and stop fostering – I’m ok with that. )

Once I know what you need I will find the right dog for your home. My first contact with the dogs usually comes via email from our Intake Coordinator. We get weekly lists, sometimes more, of dogs that we can take in. We also get owner surrenders from our website. We match up these dogs coming in with our open foster homes.

Once the dog is in the home your job is pretty simple. 🙂 Give them the love and care they deserve! If you have any concerns or questions just give me a call or send me an email! I’m here to help you. Anything from a training question to a vet appointment. We will also keep you informed of event schedules and do whatever is needed to help get your foster adopted.

Once we receive an application on your foster it will be forwarded on to you. You get to set up the first meeting with the potential adopters. If you feel like they will be a good fit you report back to me and we move forward in processing the application. We check references and if everything comes back good I will do a home visit, you are welcome to come along, and after that comes the paperwork. After all is signed and the pup moves on to their new home we start all over again.

I think the most rewarding thing about fostering (yes, I do it myself as well) is seeing all of the dogs you help go into their forever homes, knowing that you had a hand in that. No one knows where they would have ended up if we didn’t provide them with that bridge, from one life to the next.

crystal sig